Types of Tips

You know the main knife parts, but now it is time to delve deeper, specifically, into the point of a blade. The point is very important, it initiates the puncture, and must be the best hardened and tempered part of the blade; in a badly tempered blade, the point is always the first to crack or blunt.

Depending on what the blade is to be used for, different tip styles are used. Here are the three main types of tips used in knives:

English: Photograph taken by Ivan Yulaev (myself)

English: Photograph taken by Ivan Yulaev (Photo credit: Wikipedia)A drop point blade 

The Drop Point. This is where the back of the blade curves down gradually into the tip, so the blade is as thick as possible before it is thinned out into the tip. Normally, in this type of tip, the primary edge  would curve up steeply into the point; this makes the whole blade very thick, and so is used almost exclusively in knives that are small, and have a risk of breaking.

English: Picture of a spear-pointed knifeblade...

English: Picture of a spear-pointed knifeblade. Own work (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Spear Point. This is where both the top and the bottom of the blade, as they progress towards the tip, curve towards each other at the same rate, meaning the thickest part of the blade (the spine) actually goes through the center of the blade, not the top, and goes directly, without curving, from the hilt straight to tip. This type of point is used almost exclusively in double-edged knives, daggers, and swords. You can probably see why. Some fancy knives have designs where they are made so the bottom edge is sharpened along the length of the blade, as usual, but then, only the forward half of the top edge is made sharp, similar this one. Now, onto the most common blade point.

A heavy-duty hunting knife with a Clip Point style tip

A heavy-duty hunting knife with a Clip Point style tip

The Clip Point is the most common point; used in quite a few knives for style and looks. Mainly, though, it is used a lot in combat knives. The reason this type of point is used, is when the knife is held in combat style, (i.e., the knife is held in the fist, point down, and edge facing away from the holder) when the knife is used to stab, the curve in the clip point helps the knife dig in  the stabbing surface in the same motion in which the arm is moving, which makes it very easy to stab and withdraw quickly.

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